Liberty

The natural liberty of man is to be free from any superior power on earth, and not to be under the will or legislative authority of man, but to have only the law of nature for his rule. The liberty of man, in society, is to be under no other legislative power, but that established, by consent, in the commonwealth; nor under the dominion of any will, or restraint of any law, but what that legislative shall enact, according to the trust put in it. Freedom then is not what Sir Robert Filmer tells us, Observations, A. 55. a liberty for every one to do what he lists, to live as he pleases, and not to be tied by any laws: but freedom of men under government is, to have a standing rule to live by, common to every one of that society, and made by the legislative power erected in it; a liberty to follow my own will in all things, where the rule prescribes not; and not to be subject to the inconstant, uncertain, unknown, arbitrary will of another man: as freedom of nature is, to be under no other restraint but the law of nature.

– John Locke, The Second Treatise of Civil Government

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The Liberal First Amendment

The free exercise of religion shall bear no influence on any established governing body; nor shall the freedoms of speech and of the press cause offense, real or perceived, to citizen or special interest group; nor shall certain peaceable assemblies of citizens, as identified by established administrative agencies, enjoy unabridged political rights or privileges; nor shall any governing official be obliged to respect the public’s petitions for redress of grievances.

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